Do What Scares You

After a busy fall working with leaders in a wonderful range of organizations here and abroad, I am waxing my skis and getting ready to head to ski racing camp in Colorado tomorrow.

This will be my third year in a row. I blocked the dates and sent in my deposit as soon as camp was announced—not because it is comfortable or even fun, at times it is, but the real reason I started going and continue go is because it scares me.

Followers of my sporadic blog posts know that I returned to ski racing, a somewhat delusional passion from my Iowa youth (I seriously thought I could be a contender!), after a birthday that ended in “0”. I skied every chance I could as a teenager—park district bus trip to Wisconsin (I’m on it!), University of Iowa ski trip to Colorado that they foolishly opened up to area high school kids (I went on it!), weekend trips with my parents to Midwest resorts and the occasional Colorado ski vacation (I planned the rest of my life around it).

The Racing Bug

Somewhere along the way, I got bit by the racing bug and also starting racing in as many Midwest USSA division races as I could get to, which included road trips to Minneapolis to race at Buck Hill, long before Lindsay Vonn was born!

Coming back to skiing and ski racing when most of my friends have long since hung up their long underwear has taken a lot more commitment. When I was younger, it was easy to round up a group of adventurers willing to give it a go—many clad in their Iowa overalls.

These days, it is much harder for me to find friends who want to head down the hill on two waxed planks, let alone into the cold. It was this challenge that led me to explore more organized ski activities, including racing clubs and camps.

With a great recommendation from a friend and former ski instructor, I found my way to Dave Gregory’s Peak Performance Ski Camp that he holds each November at Copper Mountain and summers at Mount Hood, Oregon.

Now, as I pack up for my third trip, I have a little better idea of what to expect, and yet, the apprehension has not lifted. Did I train well enough? You can never be too fit for racing. Will I crash? No question. Will I get hurt? Always a possibility. I still go because it still stretches me. It still scares me—not in a “why again am I jumping out of this airplane?” way—but in a way that pushes me out of my comfort zone, physically, socially, mentally.

Accepting the Challenge

This year it took, even more, commitment and intentionality as I had major surgery over the summer and had to make a concerted effort to recover, rebuild my strength and confidence. It has given me even greater respect for athletes such as Lindsay Vonn who have had countless setbacks in their careers and yet come back, again and again. They make the effort and put in the work to return to peak performance, even when they have every invitation to use the latest injury to make a graceful exit from the competition.

My experience in life and especially these last few years, helping leaders, teams and organizations become more agile is that doing what scares you is where the learning is.

Getting Out of the Comfort Zone

Being a little (and sometimes a lot) out of my comfort zone is where the growth and where new confidence is built. One of our race coaches says, “If you never crash, you aren’t trying something new. You aren’t learning!”

I have realized I can’t very well travel the world talking  about The Agility Shift and helping leaders be more effective in the midst of the unknown, if I am not challenging myself to do the same.

This post is for leaders who are charged with helping your team, department or organization become or sustain your competitiveness in volatile conditions, and for those of you who see the value of becoming more comfortable being uncomfortable in your life and work.

As we move into the holiday season, which is often associated with cocooning, being cozy with friends and family (which is a wonderful way to recharge our spirits), I invite you to also look for the opportunities that lie ahead that scare you. It doesn’t have to be ski racing, or even a physical challenge. Maybe it is just accepting an unexpected invitation before you start over-thinking it, go ahead and say, “yes!” sign up, and jump in. Maybe I’ll see you there!

What are you doing/might you do that scares you?

 

 

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